The Bookshop on the Corner

The opening lines of Jenny Colgan’s message to the readers adequately captures what this book was all about:

Because this book is about reading and books, and how these things can change your life, always, I would argue, for the better. It’s also about what it feels like to move and start over (something I’ve done quite a lot in my life), and the effect that where we choose to live has on how we feel; and can falling in love in real life be like falling in love in stories, xxx

This book builds a good case for anyone to try and pick up a book… somewhere out there is a book that would peak and suit your interests – may it be a children story book, a series about cowboys and aliens, an end of the world apocalyptic novel or simply the bestsellers (either fiction or non-fiction).

There was a universe inside every human being every bit as big as the universe outside them. Books were the best way Nina knew—apart from, sometimes, music—to breach the barrier, to connect the internal universe with the external, the words acting merely as a conduit between the two worlds.

If only Nina, the protagonist, can talk to us; finding those books would have been easy. Scattered in the story are anecdotes on how she was able to touch the lives of various characters just by finding the right books.

But the key takeaway for me of the story is how readers actually need to manage real life.

Some people buried their fears in food, she knew, and some in booze, and some in planning elaborate engagements and weddings and other life events that took up every spare moment of their time in case unpleasant thoughts intruded. But for Nina, whenever reality, or the grimmer side of reality, threatened to invade, she always turned to a book. Books had been her solace when she was sad, her friends when she was lonely. They had mended her heart when it was broken, and encouraged her to hope when she was down. Yet much as she disputed the fact, it was time to admit that books were not real life.

As much as we want it to be, books are not real life. 

I am not arguing against reading books.  I could personally attest on its value in helping me cope with whatever struggles I was facing. However, this book reminds us that there is still real life out there to manage and how complicated it will be if we mix our literary journeys with reality.

“It’s not about fricking romantic picnics and moonlit walks and storybook stuff! This is real life.

To end, I really liked this book. It was a refreshing feature of various contrasts – urban versus rural living and reality versus “storybook stuff”.  There were some parts I wish were not included but overall well told. 

Nina got very lucky with her friends, acquaintances that became friends (and lovers), and timing.  A lot of things could have gone wrong but Nina had her happy-ever-after after all. 

Now, back to real life I go.

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First IPad post

Hopefully, I have found a solution to enable me to translate my thoughts into posts and eventually be stored in this Cyber Pensieve. Cluttered mind does not exactly feel good.

I (finally) decided to purchase an IPad (thanks to a friend who dropped by in the US recently).  I am new to Apple so there are still a lot of things to learn but my hope is that with this piece of portable technology, I will be able to clear my head from time to time. 

And, this one is a trial post. I am experiencing first hand how to type a post and so far enjoying it. 

Note to self, however, is that I need to find out how to turn off the sounds whenever I click. First IPad post and my hope is that there would be more to come.

Post made 09 May 2017

Beginning of Everything 

Admittedly, the main reason why this book got my attention is due to its cover. The rollercoaster was a curious thing to see in a book. I picked it up and after reading the comments decided to give it a try.

At times, I had regrets while reading – it may be the confusing references or things I could not really relate to (e.g., debate, various authors quoted, panopticon, etc). But I am glad I continued on since what I liked about this book are the emotions and interaction amongst the characters. There is a confused cheerleader, grieving sister, tentative mom, left out best friend, broken teen, ineffective teacher, and even an intelligent dog. Though not all elements were mapped and introduced, for me there was enough information to go around that allows me to relate to the characters.  It is always tricky to start at the middle of a story but this book for me was able to execute it well.

As usual, I am trying to stay away from spoilers. 

Did I enjoy this? Yes, especially on parts where I felt it did not venture towards being too intellectual. Would I read it again? Maybe but not anytime soon.

Favorite quotes:

“The way I figured it, keeping quiet was safe. Words could betray you if you chose the wrong ones, or mean less if you used too many.” – Ezra

“but I discovered a long time ago that the smarter you are, the more tempting it is to just let people imagine you. We move through each other’s lives like ghosts, leaving behind haunting memories of people who never existed. The popular jock. The mysterious new girl. But we’re the ones who choose, in the end, how people see us.” – Cassidy

And a few more quotes on growing up:

“I wondered what things became when you no longer needed them, and I wondered what the future would hold once we’d gotten past our personal tragedies and proven them ultimately survivable.” – Ezra

“But we had plenty of time for youthful indecision, both apart and together, for limping into the future past the unforgettable ash heaps of our histories.” – Ezra