Pax

Book description

From Amazon webpage –

Pax and Peter have been inseparable ever since Peter rescued him as a kit. But one day, the unimaginable happens: Peter’s dad enlists in the military and makes him return the fox to the wild.

At his grandfather’s house, three hundred miles away from home, Peter knows he isn’t where he should be—with Pax. He strikes out on his own despite the encroaching war, spurred by love, loyalty, and grief, to be reunited with his fox.

Meanwhile Pax, steadfastly waiting for his boy, embarks on adventures and discoveries of his own. . . .

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The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto

Book description

From Amazon webpage –

Mitch Albom creates his most unforgettable fictional character—Frankie Presto, the greatest guitarist to ever walk the earth—in this magical novel about the bands we join in life and the power of talent to change our lives.

In his most stunning novel yet, the voice of Music narrates the tale of its most beloved disciple, young Frankie Presto, a war orphan raised by a blind music teacher in a small Spanish town. At nine years old, Frankie is sent to America in the bottom of a boat. His only possession is an old guitar and six precious strings.

But Frankie’s talent is touched by the gods, and his amazing journey weaves him through the musical landscape of the 20th century, from classical to jazz to rock and roll, with his stunning talent affecting numerous stars along the way, including Hank Williams, Elvis Presley, Carole King, Wynton Marsalis and even KISS.

Frankie becomes a pop star himself. He makes records. He is adored. But his gift is also his burden, as he realizes, through his music, he can actually affect people’s futures—with one string turning blue whenever a life is altered.

At the height of his popularity, Frankie Presto vanishes. His legend grows. Only decades later, does he reappear—just before his spectacular death—to change one last life.

With its Forest Gump-like romp through the music world, The Magic Strings of Frankie Prestois a classic in the making. A lifelong musician himself, Mitch Albom delivers a remarkable novel, infused with the message that “everyone joins a band in this life” and those connections change us all.

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On TV series and movies

Lately, I have been sidetracked by TV series and movies. I guess this is what Netflix subscription did to me.

TV Series and movies are not as tedious with books as the level of imagination required is not that high (almost negligible) since most of the elements are presented visually.

Moreover, TV series and movies can add a bit of additional detail, magic or flair to a story after hearing how a line is delivered or how the actor plays out the role. A story may even be experienced differently if through these medium, such as Sherlock Holmes and Flipped.

Even my favorite line came from a TV series and not a book:

“We are all stories in the end. Make it a good one, eh?” – Doctor Who

Choosing one over the other, however, is personal preference. But, for me, it is also healthy is they coexist somehow.

For me, books, TV series and movies are all great sources of stories, on top of personal interactions. And, it is where everything boils down to… I am a big fan of stories.😀

In the end, I treasure each story regardless of source or details that I remember (my memory is not exactly top notch) but how it made me feel.

Now, time to get back to another story.

Interpreter of Maladies

Book description

From Amazon webpage –
Navigating between the Indian traditions they’ve inherited and the baffling new world, the characters in Jhumpa Lahiri’s elegant, touching stories seek love beyond the barriers of culture and generations.

Lahiri writes with deft cultural insight reminiscent of Anita Desai and a nuanced depth that recalls Mavis Gallant. She is an important and powerful new voice.

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Invincible Summer

Book description

From the Amazon webpage –

Four friends. Twenty years. One unexpected journey.
Eva, Benedict, Sylvie, and Lucien graduate in 1997, into an exhilarating world on the brink of the new millennium. Hopelessly in love with playboy Lucien and keen to shrug off the socialist politics of her childhood, Eva breaks away to work for a big bank. Benedict, a budding scientist who’s pined for Eva for years, embarks on a physics PhD, and siblings Sylvie and Lucien pursue more freewheeling existences–she as an aspiring artist and he as a professional partier. But as their dizzying twenties evaporate into their thirties, the once close-knit friends, now scattered and struggling to navigate thwarted dreams, lost jobs, and broken hearts, find themselves drawn together once again in stunning and unexpected ways. A dazzling depiction of the highs and lows of adulthood, INVINCIBLE SUMMER is a story about finding the courage to carry on in the wake of disappointment and a powerful testament to love and friendship as the constants in an ever-changing world.

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To “you”

To the person who took these pictures,

I know you wanted me to post these pictures in my instagran but I know it deserves more.

Why? Simple: this is one of my best memories in the Myanmar and Laos trip we had.

It is not because this is the first time I rode a bicycle in a main road.

It is not because of the relief I felt after doing it.

It is because of “you.” You were encouraging, patient and never gave up on me.

There was always this belief in you that knew I could do it. And you made me believe I could do it.

So, I was able to do it.

Thank you.

So more than my instagram, I am keeping it in my cyber pensieve as my heart swells with joy whenever I see these.

Again, thank you for this memory.

Life has its twist and turns but I hope our friendship survives. I need more people like “you” in my life.

From,

The person in the pictures

Note: I learned to ride a bicycle only in early 2016. I have not ridden one for a long time, so this was quite a challenge.

The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds

Book description

Lifted from the Amazon webpage:

Facing challenges in an increasingly colonial world, Chye Hoon, a rebellious young girl, must learn to embrace her mixed Malayan-Chinese identity as a Nyonya—and her destiny as a cook, rather than following her first dream of attending school like her brother.

Amidst the smells of chillies and garlic frying, Chye Hoon begins to appreciate the richness of her traditions, eventually marrying Wong Peng Choon, a Chinese man. Together, they have ten children. At last, she can pass on the stories she has heard—magical tales of men from the sea—and her warrior’s courage, along with her wonderful kueh (cakes).

But the cultural shift towards the West has begun. Chye Hoon finds herself afraid of losing the heritage she so prizes as her children move more and more into the modernising Western world.

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