Tao of Pooh

imageWithin each of us, there is an Owl, a Rabbit, an Eeyore and a Pooh.  For too long, we have chosen the way of Owl and Rabbit.  Now, like Eeyore, we complain about the results.  But that accomplishes nothing.  If we are smart, we will choose the way of Pooh.  As if from far away, it calls us with the voice of a child’s mind.  It may be hard to hear at times, but it is important just the same, because without it, we will never find our way through the Forest.

But the adult is not the highest state of development.  The end of the cycle is is that of the independent, clear-minded, all-seeing Child.

I first read this book way back in college.  I loved it to the point that it even appeared in my yearbook as the answer to the question “What book changed your life?”:

Yearbook_TaoofPooh

After finishing this book in 2007, I tried looking for the other book “The Te of Piglet” but I could not find it in our local bookstores.

Years passed.

Luckily, when I remembered the 2nd book, there was also an opportunity to buy it from the US.  I grabbed the chance and even got myself a new copy of the “Tao of Pooh.” So, here I am creating a post in my cyber pensieve about one of my favorite books.

Tao of Pooh talks about Taoism concepts illustrated or explained through the interactions, characteristic and adventures of Pooh and his friends.

When you discard arrogance, complexity and a few other things that get in the way, sooner or later you will discover that simple, childlike and mysterious secret known to those of the Uncarved Block: Life is fun

It starts with a description of a painting that exhibits three schools of thought and then went through each of the Taoism concepts of P’u (the uncarved block), Wu Wei (literal: without doing, causing or making) and Tz’u (caring or compassion).

The book then examined each of the characters’ main attribute to highlight some points:

  • Rabbit – cleverness
  • Owl – knowledge for the sake of looking knowledgeable
  • Eeyore – knowledge for the sake of complaining
  • Tigger – unaware of limitations

Once you face and understand your limitations, you can work with them, instead of having them work against you and get in your way, which is what they do when you ignore them, whether you realize it or not.  And then you will find that, in many cases, your limitations can be your strengths

Stories and teachings outside the Hundred Acre Wood were also in the book to further expound on some concepts.  It even used a Christopher Robin’s door sign to share this message:

The main problem with this great obsession for saving time is very simple:  you can’t save time. You can only spend it. But you can spend it wisely or foolishly.

It used the Bisy Backson (which reads as Busy, Back Soon) note to present the story of someone being so busy that they end up wasting time instead of saving it.  NOTE TO SELF: I must remember to not be the same as a Bisy Backson, or else this may ring true:

A way of life that keeps saying, “around the next corner, above the next step,” works against the natural order of things and makes it so difficult to be happy and good that only a few get to where they would naturally have been in the first place – happy and good – and the rest give up and fall by the side of the road, cursing the world, which is not to blame but which is there to help show the way.

My favorite part of the book is how it emphasizes the importance of recognizing and understanding one’s inner nature.

What we need to do is recognize inner nature and work with things as they are.  When we don’t we get into trouble

The way of self-reliance starts with recognizing who we are, what we’ve got to work with and what works best for us.

Doing so, will allow us to be the special person we all are:

The first thing we need to do is recognize and trust our own inner nature and not lose sight of it.  For within the ugly duckling is the swan, inside the bouncy Tigger is the rescuer who knows the way, and in each of us is something special that we need to keep.

Over all, this book is a great short read (158 pages) full of substance.  nth time around, still one of my favorites.

Thank you to the calm, still and reflective bear Winnie the Pooh for being just is and showing the way.

Next stop:  Te of Piglet

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